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OPAL FRUITS

VAULT FESTIVAL 2019: WED 23 - SUN 27 JANUARY. 6PM (& 3PM SAT)

“one to watch” - A Younger Theatre

“utterly engaging” - Lyn Gardner, Stagedoor

“Beasley-Garrigan is an engaging performer, clearly alert to the paradox of mining her own background to make art that will be consumed by a primarily middle class audience.” - Natasha Tripney, The Stage

“a highly personal debut… demonstrates an ability to play with humour and injustice, and calls for wider representation on our stages” - Kate Wyver, The Guardian

★★★★ - “Beasley-Garrigan manages to give a voice to the women who have no voice and in doing so, lays the ghosts of regret to rest as she reconnects to her matriarchal forebears and society’s silent majority.” - Breaking The Fourth Wall

★★★★ - “a very enjoyable act” - Plays To See

Supported by: Arts Council England, Streatham Space Project, Camden People’s Theatre, Upright Fools, Woman SRSLY.

Hands up who's bored of white people making sentimental autobiographical solo shows that use direct address, spoken-word, and gritty clichéd accounts of other people's struggles for the entertainment of the middle classes. The well-established default.

... Whoops.

Fresh off the back of a sell-out scratch at Camden People's Theatre, OPAL FRUITS is an unreliable solo show about the fetishisation of the feral female - about working-class women and the trouble with 90's nostalgia - spliced with stories from four generations of women who came of age on the same council estate in South London.

OPAL FRUITS is Holly Beasley-Garrigan's debut solo show. It's a tongue-in-cheek questioning of the broader implications of faux-working-class cultural trends and a re-claiming and re-casting of the self-congratulatory, spoken-word solo show. The show explores what it means to be making performance as a working-class artist today... to have a stake in two worlds but to feel as though you don't really fit into either.

“In 1998 a much loved British sweet changed its name to – we don’t say that name here. It was all downhill.”